What if something had happened when you were in high school and you couldn’t have completed it? A family tragedy, a major life mistake, lack of adult encouragement. Even the most entry level jobs require a high school diploma or a GED. Today we celebrate with those who for whatever reason didn’t finish high school in the most traditional way. They completed their GED. Today we say Hats off to you! Congratulations for sticking with it. Way to go, setting your goal and accomplishing it. What’s next? Trade school, a certification program or college? You have now overcome some obstacle and you are ready for the next thing to better your life.

You may not know us, but there are thousands of us cheering you on.

Please share this post or your own with #GEDGradDay included.

Thanks,

Karen

 

I’m closer than I’ve ever been to completing my first novel (cheering appropriate here). Part of the delay is my own slowness and every time I learn something new about writing I go back through the entire draft and make changes. Nonetheless I have a goal to get this thing completed and to an editor by the end of the year (more cheering please).

The other morning on my way to my writers’ group meeting it occurred to me that I have been so careful to show and not tell that there are no descriptors of how my secondary characters look. Maggie’s mom, Jen’s husband, the kids.

So this week, in addition to tightening up the ending, I am going to start at the beginning and go back through adding appropriate descriptors.

The other thing I’ve gone overboard eliminating with this draft is backstory. In my first draft, instead of peppering backstory throughout,  I basically barfed backstory everywhere to the point of stopping the story.  So, I need to go through and be sure I’ve rounded out my main characters for my readers.

What are you working on this week?

 

tea and booksOk, so I’m busy trying to write but wanted to touch base with my writing friends. You never know where your inspiration will come from.

Last year, I heard a published author say that she never reads books. All she does is write. I immediately marked her off as an ugly dog booksauthor that I will read. How can writers not read other authors? It’s arrogant to think at any point we don’t need to learn from other works. Her statement was so unbelievable that I couldn’t forget it. I’ve tried to look at it from other perspectives trying to understand the rationale. I even tried it. I went two months without reading other authors to see if that spurred me on to novel completion. It didn’t.

Reading other authors helps me understand what I like and don’t like about certain styles of writing. It also gives me ideas about transitions, escalating plots, resolution and the ever-present quandary of showing not telling.

You’ve heard the quote, “never trust a skinny chef.” I’m wondering if we should trust a non-reading writer?

Your thoughts.

Karen

 

writermeme

boy cryingJimmy was the youngest of six kids. When the county fair came each kid was given money for rides and games. When it was gone, it was gone. Jimmy was too short for most of the rides other than the merry-go-round, which he was quickly board with. He wanted to ride with his brothers and sisters, but he was too tall. While mom watched us kids, dad would always scoop Jimmy up and take him to play the games. He always seem to come home with a prize. None of us could ever figure out how. Our money didn’t last long enough to knock the right pins down or land the ring on the peg.

 

 

birthday cakeAlice finished the Y on the birthday cake. It was perfect. Placing it gently on the table she quietly called the rest of the family around the table. Emily, the mopey teen-ager was convinced that middle child syndrome had set in again and they had forgotten her birthday. No amount of encouragement from her mother changed that. With a final adjustment to the gifts and cake, with her brother and sister standing by with balloons Emily was called downstairs. “What!” As she stomped down the steps to be stopped in her tracks by the site.